Overcoming the “Holiday Brain” at Work

Holiday shoppingSometime during the height of the fall season, my mind becomes less focused on the routine tasks that accompany my job and increasingly wanders toward the holiday season. I thought I was the only one who experienced this phenomenon until my co-workers began excusing their lack of concentration as a symptom of “Holiday Brain Syndrome.” The mass revelation seemed to break down a silent wall we had all been hiding behind and allowed us to find mutual solace in the esoteric explanation of our temporary lack of productivity. With that, the doors of distraction flung open even wider; internet shopping excursions and the constant chatter of holiday plans abounded throughout offices. The nonstop reminders of holidays from Halloween to New Years Day did not help and the many mini celebrations at work only reinforced the feeling that anything but work is in vogue. For organizational leaders, finding the right tone in addressing the distractions of the holiday season and keeping employees productive while avoiding resentment and dissention among them is a challenging balance. What are some ways you can keep your employees performing at a high level without sacrificing their humanity?

 

For a small number of companies, a drop in productivity during the holiday season is not only acceptable but a welcome relief from the ordinary hustle and bustle of corporate life. For most however, increased productivity and effort is critical to remaining competitive. It is the time when companies have their last and best hope for having a profitable year. It is during this time of year, in such a supercharged environment when the work – life balance can become skewed and the lack of either can lead to additional emotional stressors. There are some underlying factors to consider when assessing your corporate policy regarding the holiday season. In 2010 Mercer, the global HR consulting firm, ranked 39 industrialized countries ahead of the U.S. in terms of how much vacation time is allotted. As a country, the United States does not mandate time off for workers, even for national holidays, so it is up to each organization to provide “time off” for employees. It is quite possible that employees who feel they are not allotted enough vacation time become less shy about stealing away chunks of time at the office in order to find the balance in their lives they require to feel whole. Also of note, according to online job search company Indeed, online job searches increase significantly between November and January.

 

The holiday season is more than a time to celebrate; it is also a time when people reflect; that reflection often leads to people considering how fulfilled and satisfied they are at work. Here are some practical ways to keep your employees working at peak efficiency during the holiday season and stick around for the next year:

  •  Embrace the reality of the season

There are gifts to buy, people to spend time with and meals to be prepared and eaten. Each of these activities require time that goes beyond the moment itself and if your employees cannot get time off for them, they will bleed them into their business hours. Try offering your employees small periods of time and resources to plan the time they will have off. This will leave them with fewer distractions when engaged with company business.

  • Offer more time off during less hectic seasons

Your employees are every bit as practical and realistic as you are, so if you provide them with a clear understanding of how why business succeed and how they are an integral part of that success, they will be more inclined measure their time off demands in line with business needs.

 

  • Give meaning to what they do

For people to feel fulfilled in today’s environment, their jobs have to mean more than the product or service provided, but rather the difference they make in the lives of those who seek out those products and services. Take the opportunity, now more than ever, to remind employees of the differences they make. Feel free to use real world examples and testimonials.

  • Consider hiring temporary workers

Well-trained, well-placed temps can provide more opportunities for your permanent workers to be with their families. In addition, it can be an opportunity for your business operations to be seen through fresh, undiluted eyes. This can be a valuable tool when recruiting due to growth or attrition and a great laboratory for testing the validity of your corporate culture.

  • Doing more in less time

Try ampping up the incentives for teams or workers who can come up with time saving ideas that do not sacrifice quality or productivity. The goal should be to provide more time off for more people. Be careful though limiting the scope to a small number of individuals will only create jealousy and resentment. So if this cannot be accomplished on a large enough scale, find incentives that are more practical.

  • Manage the managers

According to a 2007 Florida State University study, 40% of employees feel that they work for “bad bosses” not bad companies. Mid-level managers and supervisions are caught in between meeting executive demands and maintaining motivation for workers. Provide your managers with the tools, training and incentives that will build trust among employees and growth in the bottom line. Take some of the pressure off your managers by acknowledging, accepting and broadcasting your responsibility for the difficult compromises that have to be made.

  • Create a fun environment

Along with the other items that have been mentioned, the holidays are also an opportunity to show thankfulness, kindness and generosity. Full-time employees spend more than a third of their lives at work or commuting to and from, so why not have a work environment where people actually enjoy being a part.

Productivity does not have to drop during the holidays in fact, you can use this time as your organization’s Super Bowl. Your company gears up all year for this busy time so embrace the holidays and keep your employees brain in the game.

 

~ Richard

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About Richard
I have spent my entire life learning to be a better communicator in in all facets of my life. I have learned as much from my failures as I have from success; laughing, crying and loving along the way. After earning a B.S. in Communications I decided to share what I have learned while continuing my own personal growth. I believe that the better we are to each other, the richer our lives will become.

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