A Matter of Fairness

MinimumOnce again, the discussion on raising the minimum wage has heated up again; those opposed argue that the economy will be crushed under the weight of its own folly. It has been claimed that raising the minimum wage would have a negative effect on employment and at a time when the unemployment rate continues to linger around 8 percent. Employers, particularly small business employers would resist hiring additional workers or even reduce their workforce outright. Microsoft founder Bill Gates, on MSNBC’s Morning Joe, when asked what would happen if employees were paid “a lot more”, cautioned:

“Well, jobs are a great thing. You have to be a bit careful: If you raise the minimum wage, you’re encouraging labor substitution and you’re going to go buy machines and automate things — or cause jobs to appear outside of that jurisdiction. And so within certain limits, you know, it does cause job destruction. If you really start pushing it, then you’re just making a huge trade-off.”

The headline of the comment was, Bill Gates: Raising Minimum Wage Can Destroy Jobs. Ironically, the tag underneath the image of Gates read: THE WEALTH DIVIDE – THE RICH GET RICHER.

 

The minimum wage was last increased in 2009 to $7.25 per hour or just over $15,000 a year for a worker who is lucky enough to get paid for all 52 weeks of the year. Over the last 20 years, workers have been rendered powerless as worker rights have diminished and income disparities have grown dramatically. While the wealth of the top1percent has ballooned to over 40 percent of the nation’s wealth, the bottom 50 percent has plummeted to a jaw dropping 1.1 percent; and that was in 2010.  To be clear, there has never been any accurate statistical correlation drawn between a moderate raise of the minimum wage and a drop in employment. Let me say it another way; there is no proof that raising the minimum wage judiciously will decrease jobs; there is only rhetoric, assumption and false analogies. In fact, the Department of Labor, as well as a joint study by Princeton University and the University of Wisconsin reports that the last two increases had an insignificant effect on employment.

 Greed

What is reality is that raising the wages of workers is the single greatest economic stimulus to the American economy. Higher wages means that workers will have a higher stake in the health and welfare of the American economy. Even a $.90 increase in the minimum wage buys 7 months of groceries, a year of healthcare costs, 9 months of utility bills or full year’s tuition at a local 2-year college. So why do proponents raise such a fuss, it’s simple, business owners, and investors fear a reduction in profits. Anything that reduces or threatens the sacred shareholder percentage is damned as intolerable. A sad truth is that 63 percent minimum wage workers are adults over the age of 20, many of whom account for 51 of their household’s income; these are not the burger-flipping teens of urban myth. Raising the minimum wage is not only a sound investment in America’s most precious resource; it is plainly the right thing to do.

 

 

~ Richard

 

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Owning the Interview Process

The interviewI have always found that interviewing for a new job to be one of the more stressful processes I’ve gone through in life, so much so, that have often been tempted to remain at a position longer than is beneficial. The feeling of starting over, learning how to navigate a new business culture and the thought of leaving the comfort of familiarity can be worrisome for anyone. On the other hand, I tend to be a good interviewee; I am because I’ve learned to overcome my feelings of stress and nervousness and channel those emotions into a sense of enthusiasm for meeting a new challenge. Through trial and correction, I have discovered some successful ways for job candidates to walk into almost any interview feeling prepared and confident.

 

No one can tell you exactly what will happen during an interview process, every organization develops their own style and every manager has their own preferences. In general, most hiring managers are looking for candidates who are qualified to perform the duties required and mesh quickly into that organization’s culture. It is that second need which separates the hirees from the also-rans. There may dozens or even hundreds of people in your area who have similar skills and education as you, so the better you are at demonstrating to the interviewer how you’ll connect with that organization’s principles and structure, the more you will stand out and the more memorable you will become.  

 

Research and connect

Any HR professional worth their certifications will tell that it is critical to your hiring success to learn about an organization before you interview. What you are looking for is, who that organization says they are and what they are trying to accomplish. Use whatever tools you have in your arsenal, the internet is convenient, but any personal contact you have that you can talk with will trump anything you find on a corporate website, just be wary of using proprietary information and absorbing personal bias. Organizations that have a web presence will always have a section that says “About Us”, so learn about their history, their products and services, their mission and their executive management team. Don’t be shy about investigating their social media footprint either; they won’t be when they are looking at you. What you should take note of is what’s out there that is relatable to your own skills and interests and can be highlighted during your interview. Effectively connecting yourself to that organization’s interests and culture during the interview is the primary purpose for research and it makes it easier for recruiters and hiring managers to “see” you working there.

 

Be responsive not animated

Hiring managers tend to enjoy an interview more if the candidate is upbeat and responds appropriately to questions. Those who follow the interview playbook will always leave room for candidates to expand on answers so there is no need to be overly chatty and so animated that you look like you need sedation. The types of questions you’ll be asked will follow a familiar pattern from interview to interview, so get comfortable with them, but DO NOT become so rehearsed with your responses that you come off as unnatural or canned – it requires practice and there’s no way around it. Author and employment expert, Alison Doyle has a great article on interview questions at About.com that should help you prepare for the types of question you can anticipate.

 

Be in control – don’t take control

Hiring managers have sat through more interviews than you could possible go through in your career, so avoid thinking you can win them over by dominating the conversation. At the same time, you want to demonstrate genuine interest in the organization and the specific position. The absolute best way to do so is to ask questions. If you have not been given the opportunity to ask questions during the interview, near the end is where you can let your interviewer know you have some questions; this is where all the research you’ve done will pay off. Candidates should use this time to learn more specifics about their initial responsibilities, the corporate culture, expectations and special projects. Don’t waste the responses by not, briefly, connecting your strengths to the answers. This is your pre-close.

 

Ask to be hired

You would think that the fact that you showed up for the interview would be indication enough that you want the job, but something as simple as asking for the job is often over-looked, but can strike a chord with even the most hardened HR manager. If nothing else, it should at least get you to a second interview. Try the following examples and make them your own:

  1. “Based on our conversation, I believe I have much to offer your company and that the company has a great deal to offer me. Have I given you enough information to make a decision?”
  2. “I’m certain this is the right place for me. What can I do to convince you I’m the right person for the position?”
  3. “I’m sincerely interested in this position, what is the next step to move forward?”
  4. This position seems to be a perfect match for my skills and experience, I’d really like to work with you and your team.”

Asking for the job is a delicate matter; it should be handled in the most respectful way. You do not want to blow your chances by appearing too pushy or arrogant. You should be completely genuine and don’t leave your enthusiasm at home. This is your close.

 

 

~ Richard

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